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CrossFit Must Have’s from Rogue Fitness

For its participants, CrossFit is more than a workout, rather a way of life. Dedicated to the concept of functional fitness by way of WODs (Workout-of-the-Day) and creative twists on old standard lifts, the CrossFit community has come to rely on Rogue Fitness as more than a sponsor, but a virtual supplier for all their needs. A review of the best must have CrossFit equipment from Rogue Fitness could be lengthy indeed, as the sport spans all ages and ability levels with even top professionals proudly training in box gyms and garages across the world. The great news about this sport and workout style is that participants really don’t need much equipment, but the equipment that is required is fairly unique to the group. But if purchasing high-quality gear for their home or box gym, participants can save a lot of money in the long run by eliminating break-downs.

Best Overall

Rogue Echo Bumper Plate series

Rating: 93%

CrossFit Must Have's from Rogue Fitness

Model

Rating

Weight

Material

Brand

Pricing

Reviews

Best Overall
Rogue Echo Bumper Plate series
Definite Must
The Ohio Bar - Cerakote
All Around Value
Rogue Abram GHD 2.0 – Glute-Ham Developer
Rogue Medicine Balls
Rogue Echo Dog Sled

93%

#10, #15, #25, #35, #45

Stainless Steel And Non-virgin Rubber

Rogue Fitness

91%

20 Kilograms

Stainless Steel And Non-virgin Rubber

Rogue Fitness

86%

222 Pounds

2x3-inch 11-gauge Steel

Rogue Fitness

84%

4- To 30-pounds

Vinyl

Rogue Fitness

83%

87 Pounds

.25-inch Plate Steel

Rogue Fitness

In case you’ve not heard, CrossFit is more than a fad workout program. Officially founded in 2000, its actual beginnings date back to the mid-1990s when Greg Glassman and Lauren Jenai came up with the idea. The first official CrossFit gym opened in Santa Cruz, California in 2000, with an affiliate opening in Seatte, Washington shortly after. Thirteen more gyms opened by 2005, 13,000 by 2016, and 15,000 in 150 countries by 2020.

CrossFit gyms are distinct from other exercise facilities in the equipment used and group workout programs offered. The program and competitions are based on a bigger philosophy of exercise which centers around 10 components of fitness: Cardiovascular/respiratory endurance, stamina, strength, flexibility, power, speed, coordination, agility, balance, and accuracy. Affiliate gyms schedule hour-long classes where groups meet for the Workout of the Day (WOD), which is scored for individual and group performance. By design, the WODs vary widely and typically involve a form of Olympic weightlifting (ie: power cleans, snatches, jerks) performed with rubber bounce plates for a specified number of reps. Circuits combining gymnastics drills, plyometrics, rowing, running and Strongman exercises are also common in WODs.

In addition to the workouts, the CrossFit community maintains a virtual presence online where members can participate in daily WODs, track their performance, and share best practices. The community is particularly interested in nutrition and many members utilize the Paleo Diet, Keto Diet, or other forms of the same “clean foods” approach.

In 2007 the CrossFit Games were born and have evolved into a battle for “The Fittest on Earth” title. Competitors arrive at the games prepared for any kind of WOD to be presented with only their athleticism and conditioning as preparation. CrossFit competitions are hosted throughout the world as qualifiers.

Whether it’s international fame as a global superstar, or just a cool workout club with new and interesting WODs to try each day, CrossFit has something for everyone at every level. One more reason so many people continue to gear up for practice at home.

 

1. Rogue Echo Bumper Plate series

If you know CrossFit, you know bumper plates. The Rogue Echo Bumper Plates feature an IWF standard 450 millimeter diameter and weigh within 1% of their target. Officially approved for use in the United States Army’s Combat Fitness Test, the bumper plates have stainless steel inserts coated with non-virgin rubber, making for a durometer rating of 88, which means little bounce. Sets of bumper plates can be purchased in any variety of combinations, but the individual units are produced in 10-pound, 15-pound, 25-pound, 35-pound, and 45-pound variants. For those new to the sport, CrossFit is famous for WODs involving high repetitions of Olympic lifts such as cleans and snatches. Having durable bumper plates makes a big difference as you’ll be dropping the bars after an AMRAP (As Many Reps As Possible) series.

Pros

High quality and durability
Much safer than traditional plates
Good for multiple WODs

Cons

Pricey per pound
Require special bar
Might require numerous plates

2. The Ohio Bar - Cerakote

CrossFit WODs employ a variety of Olympic lift variations, and the Ohio Bar has long been the standard. Available in a wide range of colors and styles, the multipurpose 20-kilogram bar is coated in either Cerakote and sports a 190,000 pounds-per-square-inch tensile strength. With an F8-R rating on the F Scale of durability, the Ohio Bar is among the most resistant to damage by dropping from overhead, as well as oxidation stresses. Manufactured in Columbus, Ohio, Rogue Fitness offers a lifetime warranty against bending of the Ohio Bar. The bar is 86.75” long with a loadable sleeve length of 16.4” and diameter of 28.5 millimeters. Bars come in an array of color pattern options including red, black, grays, blues, greens, and orange.

Pros

190,000 PSI tensile strength
Multiple color options
Lifetime warranty

Cons

Pricey
Requires special plates
Can't use with other gym equipment

3. Rogue Abram GHD 2.0 – Glute-Ham Developer

Whether you’re into CrossFit or not, the GHD is a great piece of equipment. In addition to working the entire posterior chain with glute-ham raises facing down, flipping face up affords the GHD sit-up and a tremendous abdominal contraction. A staple of powerlifters seeking improved deadlift numbers, the Rogue Abram GHD 2.0 is a highly prized unit in any facility. Constructed from 2×3-inch 11-gauge steel with a bolt-together, triangular-base and rubber feet, this 222-pound unit doesn’t take up to much space in a gym with a 73-inch by 44.5-inch footprint. Swing-arm adjustments allow the user to adjust settings for height along 10 lock-in positions, meaning athletes of any size can utilize it safely and easily.

Pros

Multiple exercises in one piece
Well-constructed
Small footprint

Cons

Price
Must be assembled
Some training required

4. Rogue Medicine Balls

For slamming down or throwing up alongside a wall, the Rogue Medicine Ball offerings are a great way to train dynamic movements. Also used in partner core exercises such as rotational sit-ups, these “big kid” toys are lots of fun. The balls are available in 11 different weight increments from 4- to 30-pounds, all with the same 14-inch diameter. Handmade, the balls offer a precision nylon thread seam with moisture and scruff-resistant coated-vinyl shell. Designed for rough athletic use, the interior filling is dense enough to keep the ball’s shape over repeated use, but not so dense as to pose a danger to the user. The Rogue Medicine Balls come with a two-year warranty, black coloring and the individual ball’s weight printed in white lettering.

Pros

Versatile in usage
Well-constructed
Varied weights offered

Cons

Pricey per pound
Just one color offered
Might require multiple purchases

5. Rogue Echo Dog Sled

Technically, the Rogue Echo Dog Sled can be both a CrossFit and Strongman Games piece. Either way, it’s a great general conditioning tool. This offering from Rogue is a very basic model which gets the job done. Designed for either pushing or pulling, the 87-pound sled boasts 450-pound weight capacity. Best used on hard, flat surfaces, the rugged design and solid .25-inch plate steel do afford off-road trips through the dirt or mud for fun. A staple of athletes aiming for functional fitness and explosive power, sleds double as cardio equipment with tremendous fat-burning potential. Just 36.5 inches long and 37.5 inches high, the 25-inch wide sled is easy enough to store.

Pros

Versatility
450-pound capacity
Small footprint

Cons

Straps sold separately
Requires solid surface
May be weather restrictive
 
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